The Bay of Pigs

map of the Bay of PIgs as an introduction to a Shakespearean quote, "What seest thou else in the dark backward and abysm of time/"What seest thou else in the dark backward and abysm of time?

The Tempest, act 1.

During this April 2016, an anniversary escaped the notice of most – 55 years have run their course since the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961.

All events gradually sink under the accumulating dust of antique time (1), and are eventually lost in the swallowing gulf of blind forgetfulness and dark oblivion (2).  Still, the Bay of Pigs is worthy of historical memory and retention. Continue reading

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Stalin, Opinions & the Video Series

photo of stalin smoking, along with shakespearean quote, The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bonesGood my Lord, be cured
Of this diseased opinion, and betimes,
For it is most dangerous.” (1)

 

The recent video production in the series “Historical Sketches” had to do with five episodes covering the life of Stalin. The very popular blog/website thesaker.is has published the links to the various episodes. (those interested can also find them here, by following the link “Historical Sketches” in the menu – http://yourdailyshakespeare.com/historical-video-sketches). Continue reading

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What’s in a name? Nagorno-Karabakh

a rose illustrating the quote what's in a name, that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet… that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet…

On this point I would disagree with Juliet. If, rather than ‘rose’ the flower were called, say, ‘globularia’, the perfume would be the same, but the overall effect wouldn’t. For in ‘rose’ the initial ‘r’ trembles softly on the palate while being uttered, unconsciously suggesting the presence, in the rose, of the mysterious power of beauty, which “doth of itself persuade the eyes of men without an orator” (1)

Equally, Juliet’s longing expressed in the line, O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou?” (2) would lose much of its pathos, if instead of a Romeo he had been a Caruthers, or similar other name.

To trigger these remarkably idle thoughts was the news, barely mentioned in the mainstream media, of the renewed hostilities between Azerbaijan and the Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, to which I will return later. Continue reading

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The Trouble with Trump

illustrating the quote If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction“If this were played upon a stage now,
I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.”

(Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4)

By general consent, in American elections there is no kingdom for a stage, there are no princes to act, nor monarchs to behold the swelling scene (1). By tacit agreement, elections stand midway between a farce Continue reading

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Parallel Departures

Cartoon of supreme court in connection with the eulogies for supreme court justice scalia and Macbeth quote after life fitful fever he sleeps well… After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well.

(Macbeth, act 3, sc. 2)

Sometimes during the first century AD, the Greek biographer Plutarch decided to compare in tandem the lives of famous men, and to highlight their virtues or vices. He collected the observations in his famous book “Parallel Lives.”

For the purpose of this article, more than with parallel lives, we are dealing with Continue reading

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Arab Winters

cartoon on human rights & wrongs in the context of a Shakespeare quote on the winter of discontent and the arab springs“Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York…”

King Richard III, act 1, sc. 1

Five years elapsed since the first of the widely acclaimed “Arab Springs”, though it does not seem that long, as the inaudible and noiseless foot of time (1) conceals its own advance. By the way, the name, Arab Spring, comes from the US “Foreign Policy Magazine” (nomen omen). Continue reading

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Connections Dreamt in our Philosophy

There are more things in heaven and eartth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your pbhilosophy, an illustration from Shakespeare's HamletThere are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

(Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5)

Or, rather, there are apparently unconnected things, which, at closer inspection, seem linked by a logical thread. This article points to a sample of such things and to their common thread.

Given that corporate news is but corporate ideology, it’s natural for the news to dismiss as ridiculous all attempts to report the inconsistencies and the crimes produced by the ideology and their interconnection. Continue reading

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Plumbing for ISIS

“… this Shakespeare quote on news, "... this news, which is called true, is so like an old tale, that the verity of it is in strong suspicion"news, which is called true, is so like an old tale, that the verity of it is in strong suspicion”

(Winter’s Tale, act 8, sc. 2)

More than news, the following is an anecdote, of which history is full. The word ‘anecdote’ (from the Greek, meaning literally “not given out”, that is “unpublished”) was coined by Procopius of Caesarea, biographer of Emperor Justinian I. Procopius wrote a book entitled Ἀνέκδοτα (Anekdota, also translated as Unpublished Memoirs or Secret History.) It is a collection of short incidents Continue reading

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Crime and (un)Punishment

illustration of shakespearean quote from hamlet "foul deeds will rise, though all the world o'erwhelm them to men's eyes"“ … Foul deeds will rise,
Though all the world o’erwhelm them, to men’s eyes.”

Hamlet act 1, sc. 2

American visitors to this site will probably know of the event, but here is a summary for our international guests. It is a case where the evidence is undisputable. And from the evidence we can, equally indisputably, reconstruct the workings of the political machinery, with conclusions that readers, perhaps, can draw by themselves, as the “consonancy in the sequel” (1) dramatically exposes. Continue reading

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Sex, War and Patriarchy

illustration for shakespearean quote "all this the world well knows, yet none knows well To shun the heaven, that leads men to this hell” (SON 129)“… All this the world well knows, yet none knows well
To shun the heaven, that leads men to this hell”

(SON 129)

In the Sinai desert and Paris, we have just witnessed the triumph of horror, the summit of barbarity, the unseasonal festival of unreason, the waste of shame, the scenes of destruction, Continue reading

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