Shakespeare on Talking Nonsense and Saying Nothing of Substance

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing“Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.” (Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 1)

Tips for use. These lines fit any of the many who talk nonsense, or say nothing with the largest number of words. A category of people who does not lack members, at the office, in public life and so on. Search what they said and what you find, if anything, is not worth the search. Change ‘Gratiano’ with the name of the applicable subject and ‘Venice’ with the name of the city where the speaker in question gives proof of his skills, e.g. “Caruthers speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Seattle.”
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In the play. The loquacious and nonsensical Gratiano has just left Bassanio and Antonio. Bassanio expresses his opinion of Gratiano to Antonio.

Image Source http://magarcia.wordpress.com/2010/08/25/nonsense-1-everyday-nonsense/

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